EXHIBITIONS

New Exhibit: Executive Order 9066:  Memories and Artifacts

In collaboration with the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), JAMsj will host "Executive Order 9066: Memories and Artifacts," an exhibit highlighting artifacts from our museum's permanent collection. This exhibit is part of a multi-venue presentation about the complex story of the Japanese American internment, which also includes The Tag Project (at SJ ICA) and Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066 (at Art Object Gallery). 


JAMsj will also be hosting walking tours of Japantown San Jose in conjunction with this special collaboration. Walks will be offered to the public at 2:00 p.m. on March 29, April 19, and May 10. For more information on these and other walking tours available through JAMsj, contact info@JAMsj.org or call (408) 294-3138. 




Executive Order 9066: Memories and Artifacts
This new JAMsj exhibit highlights photographs and artifacts which have been recently acquired or otherwise not been able to be displayed as part of the permanent exhibits on the forced removal, incarceration and resettlement of Japanese Americans.

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Sports in the Japanese American Community
Sports have always played an integral role in the Japanese American community. Sumo, kendo, judo, Asahi baseball and Zebras basketball were all very popular pre-war sports.

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Post World War II: Resettlement
Personal recollections of Japanese Americans returning to the Santa Clara Valley after their release from the camps.

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World War II: Military Intelligence Service (MIS)
Second generation Japanese American men and women served in the MIS during World War II and used their language skills in the Pacific theater as translators and POW interrogators.

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100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team (RCT)
This military unit became the most decorated unit in United States military history. The unit was composed of Hawaiian Japanese Americans as well as volunteers and draftees from the internment camps.

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World War II: Assembly Centers and Internment Camps Exhibit
During WWII some 120,000 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated. They were placed into temporary "Assembly Centers" then desolate camps in the interior of the United States.

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Pioneers of San Jose Japantown
Starting in 1890, Issei (first generation) came to the Santa Clara Valley in search of work. In 1900, Japanese Americans established Japantown, a place for them to meet their social, cultural and economic needs in a society hostile to their presence.

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Agricultural Exhibit - Yesterday's Farmer: Planting an American Dream
In the early 1900s, Japanese immigrant families utilized specialized farming techniques to produce high yields of flowers, fruits and vegetables. Learn about these techniques by viewing the farming equipment that they employed.

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